Vegetables

Vegetables

Vegetables have been shown to­ lower the risk of heart disease and stroke, lower blood pressure, promote gastrointestinal health, and reduce the chance of developing cataracts or macular degeneration.

Canada’s Food Guide recommends that after age 50 we should be eating 7 servings of vegetables and fruits combined per day.   White potatoes do not count—they are considered a starch rather than a vegetable.

One serving is 1/2 cup of fresh, frozen or canned vegetables; or 1/2 cup of cooked leafy vegetables or vegetable juice; or 1 cup of leafy raw vegetables, like lettuce, endive, spinach, kale, collards, or mustard greens.  Try to eat at least one dark green and one orange vegetable each day.

Vegetables (fresh, frozen, or canned) are excellent sources of:

Fiber – especially in beans (navy, kidney, black, pinto, lima, white), soybeans, chickpeas, split peas, lentils, and artichokes

Potassium – especially in sweet potatoes, yams, tomato paste, beet greens, white or lima beans, cooked greens, and carrot juice

Vitamin A – especially in sweet potatoes, yams, pumpkin, carrots, spinach, turnip or mustard greens, kale, winter squash, red peppers, and Chinese cabbage.

Vitamin C – especially in red and green peppers, sweet potatoes, yams, kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower

Tips for Eating More Vegetables

Store pre-cut, pre-washed vegetables in the fridge at eye level and keep on hand a low-fat dip, like salsa, guacamole, hummus, tzatziki, low-fat yogurt or salad dressing.

Make it a habit to have a salad every day, especially if it contains chopped vegetables.

Double up your servings of dinner vegetables.

Add chopped peppers, tomatoes, zucchini, onions and mushrooms to scrambled eggs.

Add frozen vegetables like peas, broccoli, green beans, or corn to a casserole, rice, or pasta dish.

Add grated, shredded or chopped vegetables to meat loaf, pasta and rice dishes.

Add extra vegetables to soups or microwave leftovers, and sprinkle with cheese for a light lunch.

Make whole-grain vegetable sandwiches.  Peppers, shredded cabbage (or packaged coleslaw), carrots, zucchini, red onions, tomatoes, cucumbers, etc., make good sandwiches or wraps.  Add a thin slice of cheese if you wish.

Add a squeeze of lemon or balsamic vinegar after you steam your veggies, especially spinach or broccoli.

Sauté vegetables in olive oil, garlic, and herbs (basil, oregano, thyme, etc.)

Add zest to vegetables by adding herbs, butter or margarine, parmesan cheese, bread   or cornflake crumbs.  Vegetables are naturally low in fat so you can afford to dress them up in moderation.

When eating out, order salads, vegetable soups, or stir-fried vegetables.  Ask for less cheese and more vegetable toppings on your pizza.

 

Recipes

Ratatouille

Asparagus Salad Garlic & Feta

Quick Salmon and Asparagus Frittata

Baked Beets

Braised Beets with Coriander and Cumin

Susan’s Carrot Soup with Ginger

The Best Corn Chowder

Baked Kale Chips

Garlicky Mushrooms and Kale

Turkish Chopped Salad with Pomegranate Arils

Amish Coleslaw

Broccoli Coleslaw

Curried Coleslaw

 

VITAMIN A – especially in sweet potatoes, yams, pumpkin, carrots, spinach, turnip or mustard greens, kale, winter squash, red peppers, and Chinese cabbage.

VITAMIN C – especially in red and green peppers, sweet potatoes, yams, kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower

Vegetables help prevent or manage some diseases.

Lower the risk of heart disease and stroke

Lower blood pressure

Promote gastrointestinal health

Reduce the chance of developing cataracts or macular degeneration

Eat at least one dark green and one orange vegetable each day.

TIPS FOR EATING MORE VEGETABLES

Store pre-cut, pre-washed vegetables in the fridge at eye level and keep on hand a low-fat dip, like salsa, guacamole, hummus, tsatsiki, or low-fat yogurt or salad dressing.

Make it a habit to have a salad every day, especially if it contains chopped vegetables.

Double up your servings of dinner vegetables.

Add chopped peppers, tomatoes, zucchini, onions and mushrooms to scrambled eggs.

Add frozen vegetables like peas, broccoli, green beans, or corn to a casserole, rice, or pasta dish.

Add grated, shredded or chopped vegetables to meat loaf, pasta and rice dishes.

Add extra vegetables to soups or microwave leftovers, and sprinkle with cheese for a light lunch.

Make whole-grain vegetable sandwiches. Peppers, shredded cabbage (or packaged coleslaw), carrots, zucchini, red onions, tomatoes, cucumbers, etc., make good sandwiches or wraps. Add a thin slice of cheese if you wish.

Add a squeeze of lemon or balsamic vinegar after you steam your veggies, especially spinach or broccoli.

Saute vegetables in olive oil, garlic, and herbs (basil, oregano, thyme, etc.)

Add zest to vegetables by adding herbs, butter or margarine, parmesan cheese, bread or cornflake crumbs. Vegetables are naturally low in fat so you can afford to dress them up in moderation.

When eating out, order salads, vegetable soups, or stir-fried vegetables. Ask for less cheese and more vegetable toppings on your pizza.

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EAT MORE VEGETABLES

Nutritionists recommend that after age 50 we should eat five servings of vegetables a day.

One serving is 1/2 cup of cooked or raw vegetables, or vegetable juice, or 1 cup of leafy raw vegetables

Vegetables (fresh, frozen, or canned) are excellent sources of fiber, potassium, vitamin A and vitamin C.

Vegetables

lower the risk of heart disease and stroke,

lower blood pressure,

promote gastrointestinal health, and

reduce the chance of developing cataracts or macular degeneration

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2018-03-14T18:46:07+00:00 Categories: Food Post|